How to Find a Mentor

BUSINESS MENTOR
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Table of Contents Hide
  1. What Is a Business Mentor?
  2. Why Do Business Mentors Do?
  3. Business Mentor NZ 
  4. Who Is Mentoring For?
    1. How Does Mentoring Work?
    2. Why Is Having a Mentor Useful?
  5. How to Find a Business Mentor 
    1. #1. Consult Your Network of Colleagues First
  6. #2. Make Phone Calls to Prospective Mentors
    1. #3. Attending Events Will Introduce You to Prosperous Corporations
    2. #4. Initiate a Clarity Call
    3. #5. Search Online Forums and Message Boards
    4. #6. Join LinkedIn to Connect With Potential Mentors
    5. #7. Search for Mentors on Twitter
    6. #8. Form a Brilliant Team
    7. #9. Find a Volunteer Mentor on Score
    8. #10. Research the Small Business Development Center in Your Area (SBDC)
  7. Small Business Mentor 
    1. #1. SBDCs:
    2. #2. Women’s Business Centers
    3. #3. Score
    4. #4. Local Networking Events
    5. #5. The MBDA’s Business Centers
    6. #6. Social Media Usage
    7. #7. Organizations for Business and Professions
    8. #8. Veterans Business Outreach Center
  8. Questions to Ask a Business Mentor
    1. #1. How Are You Now Boosting the Growth of Your Business?
    2. #2. How Are Our Finances Doing?
    3. #3. What Specifics About Your Business?
    4. #4. What Shortcomings About Myself Stand Out?
    5. #5. What Mistakes Have You Made?
    6. #6. What Major Lessons Have You Discovered Over Your Career?
    7. #7. Is There Anybody Else I Ought to Speak With?
    8. #8. If Something Happened, What Kind of Action Would You Take?
    9. #9. What Are Your Thoughts on This Crucial Business Decision?
    10. #10. Share a Personal Story or Two to Start the Conversation
    11. #11. What Do You Think About the Specifics as Well as the Overall Picture?
  9. What Are the 4 Types of Mentors?
  10. How Much Does Business Mentorship Cost?
  11. Are Business Mentors Worth It?
  12. How Can I Find a Business Mentor for Free?
  13. References 
  14. Related Articles

There are many resources available in the realm of entrepreneurship. In the same way, there is a wealth of information available on starting and operating a business, from peers to online publications to friends and relatives. However, a committed business mentor with expertise in your industry might have the biggest influence on the development of your company. In this piece, we’ll explain business mentor NZ, discuss its purpose, the benefits for all parties involved, the difference between business mentors and coaches, and how you may find a business mentor quickly. So, read on to learn more about how to find a business mentor and what questions to ask a business mentor.

What Is a Business Mentor?

In a professional mentoring relationship, an experienced individual (the mentor) develops their own mentoring skills while imparting their knowledge, abilities, and wisdom to a less experienced person (the mentee). The mentee can receive expert advice while still maintaining a friendly and supportive relationship with the mentor. The needs of the mentee should always come first, and the mentor should modify their mentoring style in accordance with those needs.

Why Do Business Mentors Do?

  • Any entrepreneur, from the start-up owner to the seasoned CEO, should have a business mentor in their toolkit.
  • The distinctive and targeted teaching you will get is the main benefit of developing a mentorship relationship. Mentors base their guidance on actual experiences, as opposed to the generic counsel found in online content or from well-meaning family members.
  • Mentors inspire you by providing resources and practical advice. For instance, you might contact a mentor for assistance with your financial statements. In addition to sharing their experiences, a competent mentor may offer templates and a recommendation for an accountant for the next tasks.
  • However, mentors undoubtedly benefit as well from their encounters with mentees. Many mentor enthusiastic business owners as a way to support their neighborhoods. Additionally, they might take advantage of the chance to mentor a more youthful firm owner to hone their consulting or teaching abilities.

Business Mentor NZ 

The goal of Business Mentors New Zealand, which was started in 1991, is to connect new business owners with people who have been in the business for a long time. They continue to be New Zealand’s only independent, national business mentoring service provider for small businesses after more than 30 years in operation. More than 80,000 non-profit leaders and small business owners have benefited from their business support.

However, it is not a one-size-fits-all strategy. They have the ability to match your demands with the necessary knowledge thanks to their vast network of 1,800 mentors. Local business coaches are frequently available to help you in person, too. As a client (or mentee) of BMNZ, you will gain knowledge and skills from your mentor that will help you grow as a businessperson and overcome the difficulties that come with operating in today’s cutthroat industry.

Who Is Mentoring For?

If you are the founder of a startup, an executive at a non-profit, or a business owner who has had your company open for at least a year, you will benefit from mentoring. If you meet the requirements,

  • You run a small business or run a nonprofit out of New Zealand.
  • You are prepared to take criticism, which can be challenging but is ultimately advantageous to you and your company.
  • You are adamant and focused on expanding your company.
  • By being honest and transparent with one another, you can commit to the mentoring relationship and make sure that assignments are finished on time.

How Does Mentoring Work?

  • On their website, you can complete the registration process.
  • After speaking with you about your unique needs, they’ll pair you with a successful business mentor.
  • For $295 + GST, you may begin a 12-month coaching journey to improve your business management skills. It is a financial commitment that might more than pay for itself.

Why Is Having a Mentor Useful?

Regarding your personal business endeavor, you are doing well. You are prepared to volunteer your time, knowledge, and experience as a business mentor to aid the NZ small business community because you are aware of the advantages and risks. Apply using the link below if you believe you have what it takes to be a business mentor, and a member of their team will contact you.

How to Find a Business Mentor 

Below is how to find a business mentor

#1. Consult Your Network of Colleagues First

This is the first step to find a business mentor. As your search begins, get in touch with the people you already know. They have observed your efforts, therefore they are more aware of your potential for improvement.

Furthermore, your search may need to be expanded if your network is smaller. Everyone should be considered, from close friends and family to local small businesses. If you can, go to local networking events. You should also start engaging with users in your niche more on LinkedIn and Twitter. This may assist you in developing connections before beginning your outreach.

#2. Make Phone Calls to Prospective Mentors

Cold emailing or texting is a successful approach for growing your network, forging partnerships, and increasing your business. But it’s also a useful way to solicit advice from knowledgeable outsiders.

#3. Attending Events Will Introduce You to Prosperous Corporations

Networking events, both online and off, have proved quite effective at drawing enthusiastic people with related interests. You may look up these events on websites like Meetup or Eventbrite and sign up for the ones that catch your attention. Before the event, consider using these networking ideas.

#4. Initiate a Clarity Call

To find a business mentor, you must initiate a clarity call. Clarity offers on-demand consultations with successful entrepreneurs and professionals, but it is not a platform for mentoring (you must pay to speak with these mentors). It divides experts into a variety of business areas for customized phone sessions that cost between $1 and $10 per minute (such as business development or pitching to investors). There is a place where you can post your requests and get responses from businesses with the necessary knowledge.

#5. Search Online Forums and Message Boards

Online forums are a great place for business owners, both experienced and inexperienced, to talk about their operations. These forums are a great approach to seeking out mentors directly, provided that your post clearly demonstrates your promise as an entrepreneur and that you put yourself out there in the appropriate places.

You can search for mentors on Reddit in a variety of subreddits, such as r/entrepreneur and r/smallbusiness. By searching “mentor” across several subreddits, you can uncover examples of how people have previously inquired about mentorship opportunities. Use these strategies to reject any offers you encounter. Sometimes they are just consultants looking to take your money. Sometimes they may not have the expertise they would like to claim.

#6. Join LinkedIn to Connect With Potential Mentors

It’s rather easy to connect with potential mentors on LinkedIn. Considering that LinkedIn has more than 850 million users across more than 200 countries and territories, you might be able to find a potential business mentor there.

On LinkedIn profiles, you can search for particular skills or knowledge relevant to mentoring. You can still get in touch with someone if you can find them but don’t have their email address. These hashtags can help you learn about mentorship opportunities. You may even follow the hashtag to stay up to date with the most recent postings and motivational quotes from businesses and individuals.

#7. Search for Mentors on Twitter

Twitter is an excellent location to locate mentors, similar to LinkedIn. Even though it has fewer users than LinkedIn (300 million vs. 150 million). The social networking site is still a great place to network with business people. Look at your followers if you already have a Twitter account. Who is your role model? Who do you want to learn from? Send them a direct note to their inbox, asking if they’d be interested in mentoring you.

#8. Form a Brilliant Team

To find a business mentor, you must find a brilliant team. Even though starting a business can be a solitary journey of continuous learning, a mastermind group is not always necessary. A mastermind group is where peer mentorship occurs. It is an ongoing support system of like-minded people who work together on each other’s projects, exchange knowledge from real-world experience, and keep each other on track through regular meetings.

#9. Find a Volunteer Mentor on Score

By using SCORE, which connects you with a qualified small business mentor, you can receive free assistance both in person and online. Many SCORE mentors have their own successful businesses and are happy to share what they know with you for free so you can grow.

#10. Research the Small Business Development Center in Your Area (SBDC)

There are over a thousand small business development centers (SBDCs) in the US. These institutes are funded by Congress through partnerships with the US Small Business Administration (SBA) through both public and private organizations. Through SBDC programs, entrepreneurs can get free business counseling and training. They also offer tried-and-true business tools to support the establishment or expansion of your company.

Small Business Mentor 

#1. SBDCs:

By providing free business advice and training, small business development centers assist start-ups and small businesses. Everywhere in the United States and its territories, there exist host networks for SBDCs. To locate a location local to you, use a tool on SBA.gov.

#2. Women’s Business Centers

The 100 business centers that make up the Association of Women’s Company Centers’ statewide network offer financial assistance, opportunities for business expansion, mentoring and training to female entrepreneurs. It’s a terrific opportunity to meet mentor candidates at conferences that the AWBC occasionally hosts.

#3. Score

The U.S. Small Business Association and the nonprofit organization SCORE work together to pair small businesses with volunteer mentors who are executives and business owners in 62 different industries and are both in current and retired roles. You can pick a local mentor to arrange a face-to-face meeting, a video chat, or an online letter exchange thanks to the 300 chapters that are dispersed across the country.

#4. Local Networking Events

You ought to network with other businessmen at these events. Look for conferences or networking events for small businesses in general and your industry. When attending these gatherings, try to talk to as many people as you can.

#5. The MBDA’s Business Centers

A section of Congress called the Minority Business Development Agency seeks to aid in the growth of minority-owned businesses, in part by setting up company centers across the country in areas with the highest concentrations of minorities and minority business owners.

#6. Social Media Usage

Never undervalue the influence of your own network when looking for a mentor. Using Twitter and LinkedIn to connect with other professionals and potential mentors can be simple.

#7. Organizations for Business and Professions

There may be a membership fee for a professional or trade group in your industry. These dues pay for a range of costs, including networking and education opportunities, typically with seasoned company executives in your industry.

#8. Veterans Business Outreach Center

Veterans, transitioning service members, members of the National Guard & Reserve, and military spouses can all profit from the services provided by VBOCs, which includes mentorship. You can browse for neighboring locations on the SBA.gov website.

Questions to Ask a Business Mentor

Handling the business world can be difficult. An excellent resource for guiding you in the right direction is having an industry-experienced mentor. What questions should a business decision-mentor be asking? You will succeed or fail based on the choices you make and the problems you seek help with. Here are questions to ask a business mentor.

#1. How Are You Now Boosting the Growth of Your Business?

This is one of the questions to ask a business mentor. What steps are you taking to encourage business growth in spite of the pandemic’s challenges? For business owners who are having difficulty, this specific query might be very useful. With the assistance of a knowledgeable mentor, you may select the ideal organizational structure, marketing plan, and policy for remote workers for your company.

#2. How Are Our Finances Doing?

The three issues I’ve struggled with the most during these weird times are how much money we should be saving, whether we should pay off our debt completely or leave balances to save money, and when this will all be over. We want to be prepared to resume work as soon as this is finished, completing all of our outstanding projects and creating fresh marketing ideas.

#3. What Specifics About Your Business?

This is also one of the questions to ask a business mentor. Ask them for advice based on their unique experiences. What particular circumstances have they faced that called for a modification to their operating principles? In some circumstances, your mentor might be able to teach you these lessons without letting you make the same errors.

#4. What Shortcomings About Myself Stand Out?

Asking this question is challenging because it makes us reflect on our moral failures and provides us with the opportunity to act more morally. While business owners may not be aware of their vulnerabilities, they will be able to view the larger picture with the help of a mentor or other objective third party.

#5. What Mistakes Have You Made?

This is also one of the questions to ask a business mentor. Asking a mentor about their company’s failures is crucial when talking about your venture. Every business owner will fail at some point, but if you listen to your mentor and act on his or her advice, you might be able to avoid some of those failures. If you want to set yourself up for success, ask the tough questions and figure out how to avoid frequent pitfalls. It’s wonderful to enquire about someone’s success and journey.

#6. What Major Lessons Have You Discovered Over Your Career?

A great strategy for career success is to have a business mentor. My favorite inquiries are simple but powerful. What important life lessons have they encountered over their careers? Find out more about their opinions of your strengths and weaknesses. What could you do better? I’d suggest starting with these questions, and then letting the relationship grow naturally from there.

#7. Is There Anybody Else I Ought to Speak With?

This is one of the questions to ask a business mentor. Other possibilities are available than mentors. However, great mentors have many contacts who can offer the assistance a mentee needs. I usually ask the mentor if there is anyone else I should speak with regarding the topic we just covered at the conclusion of each mentoring session. One will inevitably meet new people and pick up new skills.

#8. If Something Happened, What Kind of Action Would You Take?

How such a person came to their opinion is shown by the response to the question. You can move quickly toward becoming an independent business owner and a mentor to others by becoming familiar with the mental models that the mentor uses.

#9. What Are Your Thoughts on This Crucial Business Decision?

Never be reluctant to ask their advice while making significant, potentially life-altering business decisions. After giving them as much information as you feel like giving, ask them to walk you through your alternatives. You’ll discover that, on occasion, keeping your cool just requires giving something more attention.

#10. Share a Personal Story or Two to Start the Conversation

Start by requesting a few personal anecdotes from the mentor. They feel they must disclose something to you. After establishing rapport, use situational questions to determine the best course of action for an issue you are experiencing. Make sure the problem(s) you’re attempting to solve are pertinent and try to be as specific as you can.

#11. What Do You Think About the Specifics as Well as the Overall Picture?

This is one of the questions to ask a business mentor. Entrepreneurs should be ready to give their mentor both a broad overview of their business and an in-depth description of their daily operations. The discussion that follows the following inquiries may be fascinating:

  • What would you alter if you could make my mission statement better?
  • What should I do to address a certain employee’s workplace problems?
  • How can I spread the values of moral leadership throughout my entire organization?

What Are the 4 Types of Mentors?

The 4 types of mentors include: 

  • Master of the craft
  • Champion of your cause
  • Copilot
  • Anchor.

How Much Does Business Mentorship Cost?

The cost of a qualified mentor varies. Through social networking, you can locate one for nothing. Alternatively, you may enroll in a mentoring program, which might cost $30 to $500 per month.

Are Business Mentors Worth It?

Mentors offer a different viewpoint and have more experience. Mentors have new perspectives that can help solve issues. Everyone’s career’s most valuable commodity is experiencing, and mentors frequently are aware of the challenges that lie ahead.

How Can I Find a Business Mentor for Free?

Here is a guide to finding a free mentor if you’re interested:

  • Join PushFar. 
  • LinkedIn
  • Friends and family
  • Co-workers.

References 

  1. How to benefit from business mentorship
  2. 5 Ways To Improve Your Business Skills
  3. Qualities to consider before choosing a good mentor
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